Phân Tích Bài Đọc Cambridge IELTS 16 Academic: I Contain Multitudes

Reflective English phân tích ngôn ngữ học thuật qua bài đọc hiểu trích sách Cambridge IELTS 16 Academic, “I Contain Multitudes.

Reading Passage 2: I Contain Multitudes. Source: Cambridge IELTS 16 Academic (page 42)

Các mục điểm sách, phim, văn nghệ… thường là những bài viết hay về ngôn từ mô tả và đầy sức thuyết phục. Reflective English giới thiệu cùng bạn học bài viết ‘I contain multitudes’‘Thân tôi đây: đa tầng quần thể vi sinh’, nói về thế giới vi sinh đầy mê hoặc. Qua đó, Reflective English phân tích, tư vấn học tập và tổng hợp tiếng Anh thông dụng trong bài bình phẩm sách này.

*American Speaker, Dana Ebbett, from Reflective English:

A. First Things First!

Skim-read the book review for the central idea of the article and the major point in each paragraph. This is done to answer the question type in IELTS reading tests: Matching headings with paragraphs by looking for the topic sentence and key words that follow. Those words in bold should be what you are focusing on.


*Cambridge IELTS 16 Academic | Test 2 | Reading Passage 2:

I contain multitudes

Wendy Moore reviews Ed Yong’s book about microbes

(1) Microbes, most of them bacteria, have populated this planet since long before animal life developed and they will outlive us. Invisible to the naked eye, they are ubiquitous. They inhabit the soil, air, rocks and water and are present within every form of life, from seaweed and coral to dogs and humans. And, as Yong explains in his utterly absorbing and hugely important book, we mess with them at our peril.

(2) Every species has its own colony of microbes, called a ‘microbiome’, and these microbes vary not only between species but also between individuals and within different parts of each individual. What is amazing is that while the number of human cells in the average person is about 30 trillion, the number of microbial ones is higher – about 39 trillion. At best, Yong informs us, we are only 50 per cent human. Indeed, some scientists even suggest we should think of each species and its microbes as a single unit, dubbed a ‘holobiont’.

(3) In each human there are microbes that live only in the stomach, the mouth or the armpit and by and large they do so peacefully. So ‘bad’ microbes are just microbes out of context. Microbes that sit contentedly in the human gut (where there are more microbes than there are stars in the galaxy) can become deadly if they find their way into the bloodstream. These communities are constantly changing too. The right hand shares just one sixth of its microbes with the left hand. And, of course, we are surrounded by microbes. Every time we eat, we swallow a million microbes in each gram of food; we are continually swapping microbes with other humans, pets and the world at large.

(4) It’s a fascinating topic and Yong, a young British science journalist, is an extraordinarily adept guide. Writing with lightness and panache, he has a knack of explaining complex science in terms that are both easy to understand and totally enthralling. Yong is on a mission. Leading us gently by the hand, he takes us into the world of microbes – a bizarre, alien planetin a bid to persuade us to love them as much as he does. By the end, we do.

(5) For most of human history we had no idea that microbes existed. The first man to see these extraordinarily potent creatures was a Dutch lens-maker called Antony van Leeuwenhoek in the 1670s. Using microscopes of his own design that could magnify up to 270 times, he examined a drop of water from a nearby lake and found it teeming with tiny creatures he called ‘animalcules’. It wasn’t until nearly two hundred years later that the research of French biologist Louis Pasteur indicated that some microbes caused disease. It was Pasteur’s ‘germ theory’ that gave bacteria the poor image that endures today.

(6) Yong’s book is in many ways a plea for microbial tolerance, pointing out that while fewer than one hundred species of bacteria bring disease, many thousands more play a vital role in maintaining our health. The book also acknowledges that our attitude towards bacteria is not a simple one. We tend to see the dangers posed by bacteria, yet at the same time we are sold yoghurts and drinks that supposedly nurture ‘friendly’ bacteria. In reality, says Yong, bacteria should not be viewed as either friends or foes, villains or heroes. Instead, we should realise we have a symbiotic relationship, that can be mutually beneficial or mutually destructive.

(7) What then do these millions of organisms do? The answer is pretty much everything. New research is now unravelling the ways in which bacteria aid digestion, regulate our immune systems, eliminate toxins, produce vitamins, affect our behaviour and even combat obesity. ‘They actually help us become who we are,’ says Yong. But we are facing a growing problem. Our obsession with hygiene, our overuse of antibiotics and our unhealthy, low-fibre diets are disrupting the bacterial balance and may be responsible for soaring rates of allergies and immune problems, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

(8) The most recent research actually turns accepted norms upside down. For example, there are studies indicating that the excessive use of household detergents and antibacterial products actually destroys the microbes that normally keep the more dangerous germs at bay. Other studies show that keeping a dog as a pet gives children early exposure to a diverse range of bacteria, which may help protect them against allergies later.

(9) The readers of Yong’s book must be prepared for a decidedly unglamorous world. Among the less appealing case studies is one about a fungus that is wiping out entire populations of frogs and that can be halted by a rare microbial bacterium. Another is about squid that carry luminescent bacteria that protect them against predators. However, if you can overcome your distaste for some of the investigations, the reasons for Yong’s enthusiasm become clear. The microbial world is a place of wonder. Already, in an attempt to stop mosquitoes spreading dengue fever a disease that infects 400 million people a year mosquitoes are being loaded with a bacterium to block the disease. In the future, our ability to manipulate microbes means we could construct buildings with useful microbes built into their walls to fight off infections. Just imagine a neonatal hospital ward coated in a specially mixed cocktail of microbes so that babies get the best start in life.

Adapted from “I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life” by Ed Yong, Copyright © Literary Review.


*American Speaker, Dana Ebbett, from Reflective English:

Headings in the reading test may correspond to the following paraphrases serving as topic sentences composed of the key words that represent the main thoughts:

(1) Microbes? Everywhere!

(2) Different microbe colonies between species and within each individual body

(3) Healthy microbes in human bodies

(4) A journalist and book writer who makes the topic of microbes captivating

(5) More of the book contents: Microbes discovered only recently, but with a poor image

(6) More of the book contents: Symbiotic, so vital to humans

(7) More of the book contents: Unknowingly our helpful friends are being destroyed

(8) Same as above: Unknowingly our helpful friends are being destroyed

(9) The book makes you realize that the microbial world is a place of wonder


B. Language Awareness and Acquisition:

*American Speaker, Dana Ebbett, from Reflective English:

1. Topic-specific vocabulary: ‘invisibility’ but ‘ubiquitousness’

Các từ thuộc trường nghĩa ‘hiện hữu mọi nơi mọi lúc’

+ ubiquitous: omnipresent, ever-present, pervasive everywhere

+ inhabit the soil, air, rocks and water: occupy or reside in those places

+ present within every form of life: living inside all biological creatures

+ colony of microbes: collections or gatherings of microbes

+ within different parts: inside all body parts

+ each species and its microbes as a single unit: interdependent, symbiotic bodies

+ holobiont (assemblage of a host and other living things in nature)

+ more microbes than there are stars in the galaxy, surrounded by microbes

+ a million microbes in each gram of food, teeming with tiny creatures

+ hundred species of bacteria, many thousands more

+ symbiotic relationship, living together dependent on each other

+ mutually beneficial or mutually destructive, a diverse range of bacteria

+ fungus, microbial bacterium, luminescent bacteria

+ microbial world, a specially mixed cocktail of microbes


2. Adverb or adjective combinations: adverbials of degree and degree modifiers

Đa phần các trạng từ đi trước là bổ ngữ chỉ mức độ

+ utterly absorbing / hugely important

+ extraordinarily adept / totally enthralling

+ extraordinarily potent / specially mixed

+ mutually beneficial / mutually destructive

+ decidedly unglamorous


3. Many descriptive adjectives, both attributive and predicative, and in noun phrases:

Các tính từ mô tả ở vị trí bổ ngữ (attributive), trước danh từ hay vị ngữ (predicative), sau liên động từ như “be,” “become,” “get,” “feel,” …

+ Invisible to the naked eye, they are ubiquitous.

+ microbes can become deadly

+ a fascinating topic

+ a bizarre, alien planet

+ these extraordinarily potent creatures

+ play a vital role in maintaining our health

+ tiny creatures

+ symbiotic relationship

+ mutually beneficial or mutually destructive

+ antibacterial products

+ bacterial balance

+ microbial cells / microbial tolerance / microbial bacterium / the microbial world

+ a diverse range of bacteria

C. Notes on Sentence Linkers in Academic Writing:

*American Speaker, Dana Ebbett, from Reflective English:

1. Trigger phrases denoting a purpose of an action:

*In an attempt to… / In an effort to… / In a bid to…

+ Already, in an attempt to stop mosquitoes spreading dengue fever – a disease that infects 400 million people a year – mosquitoes are being loaded with a bacterium to block the disease.

+ Leading us gently by the hand, he takes us into the world of microbes – a bizarre, alien planet – in a bid to persuade us to love them as much as he does. By the end, we do.


2. Formal subjects “It” or “What” highlighting a focus:

*It is/was … that …

+ It wasn’t until nearly two hundred years later that the research of French biologist Louis Pasteur indicated that some microbes caused disease.

+ It was Pasteur’s ‘germ theory’ that gave bacteria the poor image that endures today.

*What is amazing is that… / What we need to focus on is that…

*At best / Indeed / In reality / In fact…

+ What is amazing is that while the number of human cells in the average person is about 30 trillion, the number of microbial ones is higher – about 39 trillion. At best, Yong informs us, we are only 50 per cent human. Indeed, some scientists even suggest we should think of each species and its microbes as a single unit, dubbed a ‘holobiont’.

Reading Passage 2: I Contain Multitudes. Source: Cambridge IELTS 16 Academic (page 42)


3. Backdrop information stating a reason, a situation or a similar background:

+ And, as Yong explains in his utterly absorbing and hugely important book, we mess with them at our peril.

*A present participle phrase, subject + verb + … (According to the Farlex Grammar Book, if we use the present participle in a phrase, we give the phrase an active meaning. In other words, the noun being modified is the agent of the action expressed by the present participle.)

+ Writing with lightness and panache, he has a knack of explaining complex science in terms that are both easy to understand and totally enthralling. (The present participle phrase “Writing with lightness and panache” describes “he”, i.e., Ed Yong.)

+ Leading us gently by the hand, he takes us into the world of microbes – a bizarre, alien planet – in a bid to persuade us to love them as much as he does. By the end, we do.

+ Using microscopes of his own design that could magnify up to 270 times, he examined a drop of water from a nearby lake and found it teeming with tiny creatures he called ‘animalcules’.


4. Appositive phrase or clause:

+ Microbes, most of them bacteria, have populated this planet since long before animal life developed and they will outlive us.

+ Every species has its own colony of microbes, called a ‘microbiome’, and these microbes vary not only between species but also between individuals and within different parts of each individual.

+ Already, in an attempt to stop mosquitoes spreading dengue fever a disease that infects 400 million people a year mosquitoes are being loaded with a bacterium to block the disease.


5. Trigger phrases listing examples:

+ For example, there are studies indicating that the excessive use of household detergents and antibacterial products actually destroys the microbes that normally keep the more dangerous germs at bay. Other studies show that keeping a dog as a pet gives children early exposure to a diverse range of bacteria, which may help protect them against allergies later.

+ Among the less appealing case studies is one about a fungus that is wiping out entire populations of frogs and that can be halted by a rare microbial bacterium. Another is about squid that carry luminescent bacteria that protect them against predators.

+ We tend to see the dangers posed by bacteria, yet at the same time we are sold yoghurts and drinks that supposedly nurture ‘friendly’ bacteria. In reality, says Yong, bacteria should not be viewed as either friends or foes, villains or heroes. Instead, we should realise we have a symbiotic relationship, that can be mutually beneficial or mutually destructive.


6. Follow-up clauses or phrases referring to a result, purpose or an imaginary situation which can serve as a conclusion:

+ Other studies show that keeping a dog as a pet gives children early exposure to a diverse range of bacteria, which may help protect them against allergies later.

+ In the future, our ability to manipulate microbes means we could construct buildings with useful microbes built into their walls to fight off infections. Just imagine a neonatal hospital ward coated in a specially mixed cocktail of microbes so that babies get the best start in life.


Hãy theo dõi Reflective English trên trang Facebook “Reflective English,” nhóm “Biên – Phiên Dịch Tiếng Anh | Reflective English” và nhóm “Tiếng Anh Phổ Thông | Reflective English” nhé!



Tin tức liên quan

Quen mà lạ…
Quen mà lạ…

2530 Lượt xem

(REFLECTIVE ENGLISH) – Nói chung – generally speaking – những từ này thì ai cũng biết, đơn giản vì chúng là những từ “nhập môn” tiếng Anh. To say, to speak, to tell, to talk,… và hàng loạt các từ cơ bản như thế, quen đến nỗi, lắm khi chúng ta bỏ qua khi đọc một đoạn văn, một bài báo, không chịu tìm hiểu thấu đáo, để rồi, cũng lắm khi… chúng ta tắc tị khi đụng chuyện.
Long time no see
Long time no see

4285 Lượt xem

(REFLECTIVE ENGLISH) – Một lối nói thân mật kiểu lời chào cho những người quen biết lâu ngày không gặp mặt, nhưng long time no see chắc chắn là không đúng văn phạm. Hẳn rồi, expression này được xem là một ungramaticality, nhưng kiểu nói tiếng Anh giản lược văn phạm, kiểu pidgin English này, lại được chấp nhận khá rộng rãi trong giao tiếp hàng ngày, và thậm chí trở thành một catchphrase, một câu nói cửa miệng, nơi nhiều người.
Chữ That đa năng
Chữ That đa năng

1280 Lượt xem

(REFLECTIVE ENGLISH) – Ai mà không biết chữ that! NHƯNG… mấy ai mà biết hết được chữ that. Đấy là đang nói với người học tiếng Anh như là một ngôn ngữ nước ngoài!
Phân Tích Bài Đọc Cambridge IELTS 16 Academic: The Future of Work
Phân Tích Bài Đọc Cambridge IELTS 16 Academic: The Future of Work

4471 Lượt xem

Reflective English phân tích ngôn ngữ học thuật qua bài đọc hiểu trích sách Cambridge IELTS 16 Academic, “The Future of Work”.
Đừng so sánh cam với táo
Đừng so sánh cam với táo

1779 Lượt xem

Có lẽ với người phương Tây, cam và táo là hai loại trái cây phổ biến nhất, và do vậy, sẽ chẳng có gì đáng ngạc nhiên nếu hai từ oranges và apples được dùng nhiều trong ngôn ngữ hàng ngày, dĩ nhiên không chỉ mang nghĩa cam và táo.
Từ “in” and “out” đến “ins and outs”
Từ “in” and “out” đến “ins and outs”

1257 Lượt xem

(REFLECTIVE ENGLISH) – Tôi biết mình đối mặt với chút rắc rối khi tình cờ gặp câu “She is in with the right man”. Chà chà, hơi lạ đấy.
Thú vị với body
Thú vị với "body"

1778 Lượt xem

(REFLECTIVE ENGLISH) – Nhập môn tiếng Anh không ai lại không biết nghĩa của từ “body”. Cơ thể người hay loài vật là “body,” thân xe hay thân máy bay là “body,” và “a body” cũng tương tự như “a person,” như khi ta nói “I cannot imagine a body once lived here.” Và từ ghép với “body” cũng thế, “nobody,” “anybody,” “somebody” là chuyện abc của tiếng Anh, là cơ bản như “nuts and bolts,” ai không biết thì phải “get back to square one”.
Quarantini là gì?
Quarantini là gì?

2513 Lượt xem

(REFLECTIVE ENGLISH) – Nếu không phải là một người bản xứ nói tiếng Anh, một native speaker, thì chúng ta thấy ngôn ngữ Anh nhiều khi thật kỳ cục nhưng cũng lắm thú vị, nhất là trong chuyện ghép hai từ để tạo ra một từ mới.
She’s about a buck twenty-five
She’s about a buck twenty-five

1967 Lượt xem

REFLECTIVE ENGLISH – Tựa bài hơi đánh đố. Có thể có người hiểu đúng, có người hiểu sai, và có lẽ cũng có không ít người chẳng hiểu gì cả, nếu chưa từng gặp cụm từ này. Các bạn cũng thế, và tôi cũng thế, nếu chưa gặp thì… đành thú nhận là không hiểu.
Những biến thể lạ lùng của động từ
Những biến thể lạ lùng của động từ

2740 Lượt xem

(REFLECTIVE ENGLISH) – Rất có thể khi đang đọc một bài báo tiếng Anh, chúng ta gặp một động từ rất quen, rất gần gũi, rất dễ chịu, nhưng lần này, có vẻ… nó đi lạc. Nghĩa của nó trong câu cứ mù mờ sao sao đó, hoặc nó chẳng tuân theo quy tắc thông thường của chia động từ chẳng hạn.
Phu chữ
Phu chữ

1564 Lượt xem

Tổng thống Mỹ Donald Trump và các quan chức Nhà Trắng cuối tháng 6 vừa qua gọi John Bolton – cựu Cố vấn An ninh Quốc gia – là một warmonger, sau khi báo chí dồn dập đưa tin về việc ông này chuẩn bị ra cuốn sách The Room Where It Happened, mô tả những gì diễn ra tại Nhà Trắng trong thời gian từ tháng 4-2018 đến tháng 9-2019.
Những con số đặc biệt
Những con số đặc biệt

3587 Lượt xem

(REFLECTIVE ENGLISH) – Từ điển mở www.urbandictionary.com ngày 24-7-2020 chọn Từ ngữ nổi bật trong ngày – Word of the day – là một con số: 864511320. Thật quá sức băn khoăn: làm thế nào mà một dãy số bỗng dưng trở thành từ ngữ nổi bật nhất trong ngày?
Learn How We Can Introduce Vietnam’s Tet Celebration to the World of English (Part 2)
Learn How We Can Introduce Vietnam’s Tet Celebration to the World of English (Part 2)

2321 Lượt xem

Chúc mừng năm mới! Happy New Year! Chúng ta tiếp tục tìm hiểu cách giới thiệu Tết (the Lunar New Year holiday, or Tet) bằng tiếng Anh nhé!
Trên cả tuyệt vời
Trên cả tuyệt vời

4008 Lượt xem

Tựa bài viết là một cách nói rất phổ biến, trong tiếng Việt lẫn tiếng Anh, đến mức nhiều tổ hợp từ (collocation) dạng như thế này được một số từ điển phân loại như là thành ngữ - idiom, cho dù có nhiều ý kiến cho rằng kiểu nói này rất informal, không phù hợp với văn phong nghiêm túc.
Học Tiếng Anh hàn lâm qua báo chí – New Scientist: UK covid-19 cases fall
Học Tiếng Anh hàn lâm qua báo chí – New Scientist: UK covid-19 cases fall

1946 Lượt xem

Bài báo New Scientist này lý giải số ca Covid-19 tăng/giảm theo khoa học, hàm chứa nhiều ý tưởng hay, ngôn từ học thuật, cấu trúc hàn lâm, cách dẫn lời báo chí, ... có nhiều điều đáng học được phân tích và nêu ra.
Phân Tích Bài Đọc Cambridge IELTS 16 Academic: Attitudes towards Artificial Intelligence
Phân Tích Bài Đọc Cambridge IELTS 16 Academic: Attitudes towards Artificial Intelligence

2607 Lượt xem

Reflective English phân tích ngôn ngữ học thuật qua bài đọc hiểu trích sách Cambridge IELTS 16 Academic, “Attitudes towards Artificial Intelligence”.
Thế Giới Chủ Quan và Khách Quan, Thế Giới Cảm Nhận và Thực Tại
Thế Giới Chủ Quan và Khách Quan, Thế Giới Cảm Nhận và Thực Tại

1482 Lượt xem

(*) Reflective English xin cảm ơn thầy Trần Đình Tâm, một giáo viên tiếng Anh, đã gửi đến bài viết "Thế Giới Chủ Quan và Khách Quan, Thế Giới Cảm Nhận và Thực Tại" này để đóng góp cho mục Real-Life English.
Khi quỳ gối có nghĩa là phản đối
Khi quỳ gối có nghĩa là phản đối

2492 Lượt xem

(REFLECTIVE ENGLISH) – Những ngày đầu tháng 6-2020, sau sự kiện một cảnh sát Mỹ ghì cổ – putting a knee on the neck – gây ra cái chết của người đàn ông da màu George Floyd, báo chí quốc tế tràn ngập hình ảnh người dân Mỹ xuống đường biểu tình phản đối, ôn hòa có, bạo lực có, cướp bóc có – peaceful, violent, looting.
Never monkey with the beasts
Never monkey with the beasts

3824 Lượt xem

(REFLECTIVE ENGLISH) – Khi nghe câu nói: Even if you go bananas, never monkey with the beasts, hẳn không ít người sẽ thấy lạ tai, chẳng hiểu “chuối” và “khỉ” có liên quan gì với nhau không. Động từ to monkey, cho dù xuất phát từ khỉ, đã biến đổi nghĩa đi ít nhiều. Nhưng thôi, chúng ta sẽ trở lại với câu này vào cuối bài viết, khi mọi chuyện đã “hai năm rõ mười”.
Dịch tục ngữ?
Dịch tục ngữ?

3750 Lượt xem

(REFLECTIVE ENGLISH) – Nếu dịch nghĩa là phản, to translate is to betray, thì điều này đặc biệt đúng khi đề cập đến tục ngữ (proverbs) hay thành ngữ (idioms). Nếu bạn bỏ công tìm thành ngữ “Lúng túng như gà mắc tóc” trong tiếng Anh chẳng hạn, thì có lẽ bạn sẽ uổng công. Thử google thành ngữ này, kết quả “Embarassing as a chicken with hair” chắc chắn sẽ khiến cho bạn thật sự… lúng túng.
Học Tiếng Anh cùng New Scientist: Australia’s Delta Wave
Học Tiếng Anh cùng New Scientist: Australia’s Delta Wave

1710 Lượt xem

Reflective English trích dẫn tin New Scientist (Covid-19: Lockdown not enough to stop Australia’s delta variant crisis) về tình dịch dịch bệnh Covid-19 ở Sydney, Australia, có những điểm tương đồng với tình hình chống dịch ở thành phố Hồ Chí Minh.

Bình luận
  • Đánh giá của bạn
Đã thêm vào giỏ hàng