Phân Tích Bài Đọc Cambridge IELTS 16 Academic: Attitudes towards Artificial Intelligence

Reflective English phân tích ngôn ngữ học thuật qua bài đọc hiểu trích sách Cambridge IELTS 16 Academic, “Attitudes towards Artificial Intelligence.

Reading Passage 3: Attitudes towards Artificial Intelligence. Source: Cambridge IELTS 16 Academic (page 91)

*Phân Tích Bài Đọc Cambridge IELTS 16 Academic: Attitudes towards Artificial Intelligence:

+ Exploring text structure / organization:

+ Situation > Problem > Factors / Findings > Recommendations > Conclusion

+ Text structure expressions like ‘On the other hand, …’

+ Word range: Predictions and Attitudes as well as useful expressions


1. This is a very good example of an IELTS practice test where you skim-read first to identify text organization. Once you get to know the outline of a text, comprehension becomes much easier. Focusing on those green colour parts of text enables you to make sense of each component of the text structure in bold red.

2. While you read, pay attention to the underlined trigger phrases. Doing this helps readers follow the line of thought which in turn facilitates comprehension, with text cohesion or connectedness made clearer.

3. After you read: Take notes of some topic-specific vocabulary and useful expressions to boost your language awareness and long-term acquisition.

4. Now get ready, set, and go enjoy reading!


*Cambridge IELTS 16 Academic | Test 4 | Reading Passage 3:

Attitudes towards Artificial Intelligence

FACTS / CURRENT SITUATIONS

Artificial intelligence (AI) can already predict the future. Police forces are using it to map when and where crime is likely to occur. Doctors can use it to predict when a patient is most likely to have a heart attack or stroke. Researchers are even trying to give AI imagination so it can plan for unexpected consequences.

*American Professor Steven Lawrence, Ho Chi Minh City:

PROBLEMS / CONFLICTS

Many decisions in our lives require a good forecast, and AI is almost always better at forecasting than we are. Yet for all these technological advances, we still seem to deeply lack confidence in AI predictions. Recent cases show that people don’t like relying on AI and prefer to trust human experts, even if these experts are wrong.

IDENTIFYING CAUSE SHEDS LIGHT ON SOLUTION

If we want AI to really benefit people, we need to find a way to get people to trust it. To do that, we need to understand why people are so reluctant to trust AI in the first place.

Take the case of Watson for Oncology, one of technology giant IBM’s supercomputer programs. Their attempt to promote this program to cancer doctors was a PR disaster. The AI promised to deliver top-quality recommendations on the treatment of 12 cancers that accounted for 80% of the world’s cases. But when doctors first interacted with Watson, they found themselves in a rather difficult situation. On the one hand, if Watson provided guidance about a treatment that coincided with their own opinions, physicians did not see much point in Watson’s recommendations. The supercomputer was simply telling them what they already knew, and these recommendations did not change the actual treatment.

On the other hand, if Watson generated a recommendation that contradicted the experts’ opinion, doctors would typically conclude that Watson wasn’t competent. And the machine wouldn’t be able to explain why its treatment was plausible because its machine-learning algorithms were simply too complex to be fully understood by humans. Consequently, this has caused even more suspicion and disbelief, leading many doctors to ignore the seemingly outlandish AI recommendations and stick to their own expertise.

This is just one example of people’s lack of confidence in AI and their reluctance to accept what AI has to offer. Trust in other people is often based on our understanding of how others think and having experience of their reliability. This helps create a psychological feeling of safety. AI, on the other hand, is still fairly new and unfamiliar to most people. Even if it can be technically explained (and that’s not always the case), AI’s decision-making process is usually too difficult for most people to comprehend. And interacting with something we don’t understand can cause anxiety and give us a sense that we’re losing control.

Many people are also simply not familiar with many instances of AI actually working, because it often happens in the background. Instead, they are acutely aware of instances where AI goes wrong. Embarrassing AI failures receive a disproportionate amount of media attention, emphasising the message that we cannot rely on technology. Machine learning is not foolproof, in part because the humans who design it aren’t.

Feelings about AI run deep. In a recent experiment, people from a range of backgrounds were given various sci-fi films about AI to watch and then asked questions about automation in everyday life. It was found that, regardless of whether the film they watched depicted AI in a positive or negative light, simply watching a cinematic vision of our technological future polarised the participants’ attitudes. Optimists became more extreme in their enthusiasm for AI and sceptics became even more guarded.

This suggests people use relevant evidence about AI in a biased manner to support their existing attitudes, a deep-rooted human tendency known as “confirmation bias”. As AI is represented more and more in media and entertainment, it could lead to a society split between those who benefit from AI and those who reject it. More pertinently, refusing to accept the advantages offered by AI could place a large group of people at a serious disadvantage.

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR A SOLUTION

Fortunately, we already have some ideas about how to improve trust in AI. Simply having previous experience with AI can significantly improve people’s opinions about the technology, as was found in the study mentioned above. Evidence also suggests the more you use other technologies such as the internet, the more you trust them.

Another solution may be to reveal more about the algorithms which AI uses and the purposes they serve. Several high-profile social media companies and online marketplaces already release transparency reports about government requests and surveillance disclosures. A similar practice for AI could help people have a better understanding of the way algorithmic decisions are made.

Research suggests that allowing people some control over AI decision-making could also improve trust and enable AI to learn from human experience. For example, one study showed that when people were allowed the freedom to slightly modify an algorithm, they felt more satisfied with its decisions, more likely to believe it was superior and more likely to use it in the future.

CONCLUSION

We don’t need to understand the intricate inner workings of AI systems, but if people are given a degree of responsibility for how they are implemented, they will be more willing to accept AI into their lives.

Source: ‘People don’t trust Al – here’s how we can change that,’ by Vyacheslav Polonski, January 10, 2018


*American Professor Steven Lawrence, Ho Chi Minh City:

SKIM FOR GIST – General idea and text organization

LINE OF THOUGHT – Topic-specific vocabulary / Range of words

*Attitudes towards AI:

+ predict the future

+ be likely to occur

+ plan for unexpected consequences

+ require a good forecast

+ lack confidence in AI predictions / people’s lack of confidence in AI

+ trust human experts

+ be so reluctant to trust AI in the first place

+ contradict the experts’ opinion

+ explain why its treatment was plausible (plausible: reasonable, credible, acceptable)

+ cause even more suspicion and disbelief

+ ignore the seemingly outlandish AI recommendations (outlandish: bizarre, peculiar, eccentric)

+ reluctance to accept what AI has to offer

+ having experience of their reliability

+ a psychological feeling of safety

+ cause anxiety

+ simply not familiar with many instances of AI actually working

+ acutely aware of instances where AI goes wrong

+ we cannot rely on technology

+ machine learning is not foolproof (foolproof: failsafe, infallible, error-free)

+ sceptics became even more guarded (sceptics: cynics, disbelievers, doubting Thomas)

+ be known as “confirmation bias”


*Useful Expressions:

Reading Passage 3: Attitudes towards Artificial Intelligence. Source: Cambridge IELTS 16 Academic (page 92)

+ acutely aware of instances where AI goes wrong

+ receive a disproportionate amount of media attention

+ in part because the humans who design it aren’t

+ depict AI in a positive or negative light

+ polarise the participants’ attitudes

+ sceptics became even more guarded

+ a deep-rooted human tendency

+ it could lead to a society split

+ more pertinently: more relevantly / fittingly / significantly

+ …, as was found in the study mentioned above


*Text Structure Expressions:

FACTS / CURRENT SITUATIONS

+ can already predict…

+ are using…

+ are even trying to…

+ can plan for…

PROBLEMS / CONFLICTS

+ Yet for all these technological advances, we still seem to…

+ Despite / Regardless of …

+ Recent cases show that …

+ … even if these experts are wrong.

IDENTIFYING CAUSE SHEDS LIGHT ON SOLUTIONS

+ Take the case of Watson for Oncology,

+ On the one hand, if …

+ On the other hand, if …

+ This is just one example of …

+ This helps create …

+ Even if it can be technically explained …

+ And that’s not always the case, …

+ Instead, …

+ …, in part because …

+ Regardless of whether the film they watched depicted AI in a positive or negative light, …

+ This suggests people (should) …

+ As AI is represented …

+ It could lead to …

+ More pertinently, …

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR SOLUTION

+ Fortunately, we already have …

+ …, as was found in the study mentioned above.

+ Evidence also suggests …

+ Another solution may be to …

+ A similar practice for AI could help people …

+ Research suggests that …

CONCLUSION

+ We don’t need to …

+ But if people are …

+ …, they will be more willing to …


Hãy theo dõi Reflective English trên trang Facebook “Reflective English,” nhóm “Biên – Phiên Dịch Tiếng Anh | Reflective English” và nhóm “Tiếng Anh Phổ Thông | Reflective English” nhé!



Tin tức liên quan

Quen mà lạ…
Quen mà lạ…

2678 Lượt xem

(REFLECTIVE ENGLISH) – Nói chung – generally speaking – những từ này thì ai cũng biết, đơn giản vì chúng là những từ “nhập môn” tiếng Anh. To say, to speak, to tell, to talk,… và hàng loạt các từ cơ bản như thế, quen đến nỗi, lắm khi chúng ta bỏ qua khi đọc một đoạn văn, một bài báo, không chịu tìm hiểu thấu đáo, để rồi, cũng lắm khi… chúng ta tắc tị khi đụng chuyện.
Learn How We Can Introduce Vietnam’s Tet Celebration to the World of English (Part 2)
Learn How We Can Introduce Vietnam’s Tet Celebration to the World of English (Part 2)

2860 Lượt xem

Chúc mừng năm mới! Happy New Year! Chúng ta tiếp tục tìm hiểu cách giới thiệu Tết (the Lunar New Year holiday, or Tet) bằng tiếng Anh nhé!
Khi quỳ gối có nghĩa là phản đối
Khi quỳ gối có nghĩa là phản đối

2854 Lượt xem

(REFLECTIVE ENGLISH) – Những ngày đầu tháng 6-2020, sau sự kiện một cảnh sát Mỹ ghì cổ – putting a knee on the neck – gây ra cái chết của người đàn ông da màu George Floyd, báo chí quốc tế tràn ngập hình ảnh người dân Mỹ xuống đường biểu tình phản đối, ôn hòa có, bạo lực có, cướp bóc có – peaceful, violent, looting.
She’s about a buck twenty-five
She’s about a buck twenty-five

2308 Lượt xem

REFLECTIVE ENGLISH – Tựa bài hơi đánh đố. Có thể có người hiểu đúng, có người hiểu sai, và có lẽ cũng có không ít người chẳng hiểu gì cả, nếu chưa từng gặp cụm từ này. Các bạn cũng thế, và tôi cũng thế, nếu chưa gặp thì… đành thú nhận là không hiểu.
Phu chữ
Phu chữ

1875 Lượt xem

Tổng thống Mỹ Donald Trump và các quan chức Nhà Trắng cuối tháng 6 vừa qua gọi John Bolton – cựu Cố vấn An ninh Quốc gia – là một warmonger, sau khi báo chí dồn dập đưa tin về việc ông này chuẩn bị ra cuốn sách The Room Where It Happened, mô tả những gì diễn ra tại Nhà Trắng trong thời gian từ tháng 4-2018 đến tháng 9-2019.
Ngôn ngữ của Trump (Kỳ 1)
Ngôn ngữ của Trump (Kỳ 1)

1846 Lượt xem

Chẳng cần thống kê, những người theo dõi chính trường Mỹ thời gian gần đây đều biết rằng Trump nói nhiều. Từ những cuộc tranh luận với ứng viên Dân chủ Joe Biden cho đến các cuộc vận động tranh cử, ai cũng thấy vị Tổng thốnthứ 45 của Hoa Kỳ, Donald Trump, đã nói không biết mệt mỏi, đôi khi nói liên tục vài tiếng đồng hồ.
Những biến thể lạ lùng của động từ
Những biến thể lạ lùng của động từ

3029 Lượt xem

(REFLECTIVE ENGLISH) – Rất có thể khi đang đọc một bài báo tiếng Anh, chúng ta gặp một động từ rất quen, rất gần gũi, rất dễ chịu, nhưng lần này, có vẻ… nó đi lạc. Nghĩa của nó trong câu cứ mù mờ sao sao đó, hoặc nó chẳng tuân theo quy tắc thông thường của chia động từ chẳng hạn.
Tôi đi tìm chữ
Tôi đi tìm chữ

1872 Lượt xem

(REFLECTIVE ENGLISH) – Tựa bài viết được đặt cho văn vẻ một chút, cho literary and flowery một chút, chứ thực ra, người viết chỉ đang làm công việc thủ công trong việc dịch thuật: tìm từ ngữ tương đồng giữa tiếng Việt và tiếng Anh.
Phân Tích Bài Đọc Cambridge IELTS 16 Academic: The Future of Work
Phân Tích Bài Đọc Cambridge IELTS 16 Academic: The Future of Work

5560 Lượt xem

Reflective English phân tích ngôn ngữ học thuật qua bài đọc hiểu trích sách Cambridge IELTS 16 Academic, “The Future of Work”.
Goodness là gì?
Goodness là gì?

3005 Lượt xem

(REFLECTIVE ENGLISH) – Just for the sake of asking. Hỏi chỉ để hỏi, vì ai cũng biết “goodness” nghĩa là sự tốt lành. Nhưng bài viết không nói về sự tốt lành, mà là về “cái sự.”
Chặng đua nước rút (Part 3)
Chặng đua nước rút (Part 3)

1897 Lượt xem

Bầu cử tổng thống Mỹ đã bước vào giai đoạn cuối cùng. Cho đến thời điểm này, dù còn khoảng một tháng nữa mới đến Election Day, nhưng cử tri ở nhiều bang đã bắt đầu đi bỏ phiếu sớm – early voting.
Áo dài trong tiếng Anh là… ao dai
Áo dài trong tiếng Anh là… ao dai

3016 Lượt xem

(REFLECTIVE ENGLISH) – Tổng thống Hoa Kỳ Donald Trump, trong cuộc vận động tranh cử ngày 20-6-2020 tại Tulsa, Oklahoma, đã dùng từ kung flu khi nói đến nguồn gốc đại dịch Covid-19 đang tàn phá nước Mỹ.
Học tiếng Anh qua New Scientist: Covid-19 Vaccines and Myocarditis
Học tiếng Anh qua New Scientist: Covid-19 Vaccines and Myocarditis

2518 Lượt xem

Reflective English trích dẫn một bài báo từ New Scientist bàn về hệ quả vaccine Covid-19 nhằm phân tích ngôn ngữ khoa học cũng như cách viết báo dễ theo dõi theo từng đoạn văn ngắn, từ 1 đến 3 câu ghép và câu phức ghép.
Buồn như con chuồn chuồn
Buồn như con chuồn chuồn

2459 Lượt xem

Có lẽ ít nhiều một số người trong chúng ta đôi khi cũng đặt câu hỏi – bâng quơ cho vui thôi – rằng Is the dragonfly really sad? Hoặc con gián có chán không.
In-person voting, mail-in voting, và absentee voting (Part 2)
In-person voting, mail-in voting, và absentee voting (Part 2)

2444 Lượt xem

(REFLECTIVE ENGLISH) – Như đã trình bày trong bài trước, Election Day kỳ bầu cử này được ấn định vào ngày 3-11-2020. Cử tri đoàn – Electoral College – được thành lập bốn năm một lần, gồm 538 electors, để bầu cho ứng viên tổng thống nào đạt quá bán tại từng bang.
Chữ That đa năng
Chữ That đa năng

1504 Lượt xem

(REFLECTIVE ENGLISH) – Ai mà không biết chữ that! NHƯNG… mấy ai mà biết hết được chữ that. Đấy là đang nói với người học tiếng Anh như là một ngôn ngữ nước ngoài!
Dịch tục ngữ?
Dịch tục ngữ?

4059 Lượt xem

(REFLECTIVE ENGLISH) – Nếu dịch nghĩa là phản, to translate is to betray, thì điều này đặc biệt đúng khi đề cập đến tục ngữ (proverbs) hay thành ngữ (idioms). Nếu bạn bỏ công tìm thành ngữ “Lúng túng như gà mắc tóc” trong tiếng Anh chẳng hạn, thì có lẽ bạn sẽ uổng công. Thử google thành ngữ này, kết quả “Embarassing as a chicken with hair” chắc chắn sẽ khiến cho bạn thật sự… lúng túng.
Anh Ngữ Học Thuật
Anh Ngữ Học Thuật

2059 Lượt xem

Academic Reading & Writing for IELTS: Linguistic Features of Academic Writing Phần nhiều bài viết học thuật hay báo cáo nghiên cứu khoa học bắt đầu với việc đặt vấn đề trong hoàn cảnh xã hội hay tự nhiên; nối tiếp là hiện tượng, sự cố hay xu hướng phát triển; lý giải nguyên nhân và hệ quả liên đới; cuối cùng là giả định đánh giá tác động sau này.
Electoral votes versus popular votes (Part 1)
Electoral votes versus popular votes (Part 1)

2179 Lượt xem

(REFLECTIVE ENGLISH) – Loạt bài viết về Bầu cử Tổng thống Mỹ chủ yếu nhằm giới thiệu cho bạn đọc những từ ngữ phổ biến trong tiếng Anh liên quan đến sự kiện này, chứ không nhằm phân tích bên thắng-bên thua. Do sử dụng nguồn tin từ một số bài báo Mỹ, nên rất có thể có những chỗ trích từ nguyên bản ít nhiều mang tính định kiến, nhưng đó không phải là chủ đích cũa Ban Biên soạn Reflective English. 
Học Tiếng Anh hàn lâm qua báo chí – New Scientist: UK covid-19 cases fall
Học Tiếng Anh hàn lâm qua báo chí – New Scientist: UK covid-19 cases fall

2245 Lượt xem

Bài báo New Scientist này lý giải số ca Covid-19 tăng/giảm theo khoa học, hàm chứa nhiều ý tưởng hay, ngôn từ học thuật, cấu trúc hàn lâm, cách dẫn lời báo chí, ... có nhiều điều đáng học được phân tích và nêu ra.
Học tiếng Anh qua New Scientist: Blood clot risk higher after infection than vaccination
Học tiếng Anh qua New Scientist: Blood clot risk higher after infection than vaccination

1999 Lượt xem

Reflective English phân tích ngôn ngữ học thuật qua một tin New Scientist: “Covid-19 news: Blood clot risk higher after infection than vaccination”.

Bình luận
  • Đánh giá của bạn
Đã thêm vào giỏ hàng